Dr Steven Niederer

photo steve Dr Steven Niederer's research is characterised by the use of multi-scale and multi-physics computational models of the heart to investigate fundamental physiological questions and gain insight into patient pathologies and treatments. This work includes the development of novel methods for integrating and interpreting patient data, evaluating new medical devices using computational modelling and developing patient specific models. His research is highly interdisciplinary, working closely with imaging scientists, basic researchers and cardiologists with a strong focus on clinical translation.

Dr Pablo Lamata

photo pablo Dr Pablo Lamata focuses on the synergies between computational cardiac models and medical image analysis. His main driver is to reach the clinical translation, proposing novel diagnostic biomarkers to better stratify patients. His main interests are the analysis of cardiac shape through computational meshes, non-invasive methods to estimate central blood pressure and its components, and the robust estimation of metrics of diastolic performance (myocardial stiffness and decaying active tension).

Dr Sander Land

photo sander

Dr Sander Land holds a D.Phil. in Computer Science from the University of Oxford. Previously, he was awarded the M&I Informatie Scriptieprijs for best Computer Science thesis in the Netherlands by the Royal Holland Society of Sciences and Humanities.

His main research interest is in developing biophysically detailed models of cardiac contraction and electromechanics, quantitatively linking cellular experimental data and whole-organ function for a better understanding of cardiac physiology, and developing numerical methods for more efficient electromechanical simulations. He is currently working with Professor Jon Kentish on developing a contraction model of human cardiomyocytes, increasing the predictive power of electromechanical models for use with human clinical data.

Dr Alexandre Lewalle

Publications:

Projects:

Cardiac Physiology
photo alex Dr Alex Lewalle completed his PhD in semiconductor physics at Cambridge, and subsequently refocussed his research toward the physics/biology interface. His general research interest is in the mechanisms of force generation in biological systems, from the molecular to whole-organ levels. His research, combining experimental and modelling approaches, has included piconewton measurements of the myosin motor protein, which produces muscle contraction, and of red-blood-cell membrane deformation. He has also studied the dynamics of actin filament growth, the mechanical driving force in cell motility. His current focus is on understanding, through computational simulations, the roles played by electrophysiological activity and tissue structure in heart contraction.

Dr Bernardo de Oliveira

photo bernardo Dr Bernardo de Oliveira holds a PhD in Natural Sciences from the University of Oslo. Previously, he has worked at FISIOCOMP, the laboratory of Computational Physiology at The Federal University of Juiz de Fora in Brazil. He also worked at the Cardiac Modelling department at Simula Research Laboratory during his PhD in Oslo. His main research interest include multi-scale modelling of cardiac electrophysiology and mechanics, linking subcellular and cellular activity to whole organ function for physiological and pathological conditions. His current project involve the modelling of the acute and chronic cardiotoxicity of multiple drugs, with a special focus on the detrimental effects of chemotherapeutic drugs to cardiac mitochondrial function.

Dr Cesare Corrado

Publications:

Projects:

Modelling the Atria
photo Andrew Dr. Cesare Corrado obtained a 5 years master degree (old italian system, vecchio ordinamento) in Aerospace Engineering at the Technical University of Milan (Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy). The guidance was numerical aerodynamics and the thesis title "Approximation of fluid-structure interaction problems with Immersed Finite Element Method". He also obtained a PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Padua with the thesis "The cardiovascular system: a numerical study". His research experiences deal with Numerical modelling of combustion phenomena in tunnels (Research Fellows, Dep. Of Applied Physics, University of Padua ), numerical simulation of fluid-structure interaction problems (2008-2010, Dep. Of Civil Eng., University of Padua), heart Electrophysiology and data assimilation (INRIA, France 2011-2013 and INRIA-Bordeaux 2013-2014).

Dr Angela Lee

Publications:

Projects:

Modelling Heart Failure
photo angela The current focus of Angela's work is to create biophysically based patient specific models of the heart to look at the changes in the electrophysiology, mechanics and geometry of the heart after sustained cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT). It has been observed that changes in the heart function and geometry occur after CRT implantation, which may cause the optimal CRT lead location to change. These models can then be used to investigate what effects chronic changes have on the optimal CRT lead placement and also for predictions of optimal lead placements both acutely and chronically. This research in using computational models to provide insight into physiological functions follows on from Angela's PhD work in the soft tissue mechanics field investigating breast image fusion using biomechanics.

Dr Eoin Hyde

Publications:

Projects:

Modelling Heart Failure
photo eoin Since joining the Dept. of Biomedical Engineering at King's College London (KCL) in May 2013, Eoin Hyde (EH) has been investigating several aspects of cardiac electrophysiology. His primary interest lies in the elucidation and quantification of endocardial pacing techniques for Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy (CRT), as opposed to the current standard of transvenous epicardial pacing. This research is characterised by the development of integrated multi-scale and multi-physics models, as well as both simple and detailed cardiac geometries.

Prior to joining the Niederer Cardiac Modelling Group at KCL, EH obtained his DPhil from the University of Oxford with a dissertation focused on the parameterisation of continuum myocardial perfusion models from high-resolution anatomically-accurate discrete arterial vascular models.

Dr Orod Razeghi

Publications:

Projects:

photo orod Dr Orod Razeghi holds a PhD in Information Technology from the University of Nottingham. His PhD focused on developing "Human in the Loop" algorithms for understanding visual content, in particular interactive methods of object recognition for medical applications. Previously, he received his Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with Robotics from the same university. His interests primarily lie at the intersection of computer vision, medical imaging and machine learning, as well as applications of "Human in the Loop" algorithms. Since joining the department in September 2015, he has been developing a platform for clinicians to quantify, analyse and interrogate motion measurements from cardiac CT images.

Thomas Fastl

Publications:

Projects:

Modelling the Atria
photo Andrew Thomas Fastl received his bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering with specialization in Bioimaging and Bioinstrumentation and his master's degree in Mechanical Engineering focusing on Biomechanics from Graz University of Technology. He has been associated with the Institute of Biophysics at the Medical University of Graz before starting as a research student at the Department of Biomedical Engineering at King's College London working on personalized computational models of atrial electromechanics.

Thomas Fastl's research interests focus on the theory, development, and application of computational methods to physical problems in biomedical engineering, especially to clinically relevant problems in cardiology. Therefore, his core expertise includes medical imaging, image analysis, electrophysiology, continuum mechanics and related constitutive theory as well as the development and application of the nonlinear finite element method using high-performance computing.

Dr Anastasia Nasopoulou

Publications:

Projects:

Modelling Heart Failure
photo Andrew I am a PhD student working in myocardial material parameter estimation using diastolic data. I studied civil engineering in National Technical University of Athens, Greece majoring in geotechnical engineering. Afterwards I did an MSc at Imperial College, London in Biomedical Engineering where I studied Biomechanics and my thesis was on the effects of the extraocular muscles on the optic nerve head strain field and its possible impact in glaucoma. In my PhD my main interest areas involve large deformation mechanics, myocardial material laws and parameter estimation.

Caroline Mendonca Costa

Publications:

photo caroline Caroline Mendonca Costa received the B.Sc. degree in computer science from the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, Brazil, in 2009 and the M.Sc. degree in computational modelling from the UFJF in 2011. She is currently working towards a Ph.D. degree at the Institute of Mathematics and Scientific Computing, University of Graz, Graz, Austria. Previously, she worked as a Research Assistant at FISIOCOMP, the laboratory of Computational Physiology at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora in Brazil (2005 - 2011), at Bioquant at the University of Heidelberg, Germany (2011), and at the Computational Cardiology group at the Medical University of Graz, Austria (2011 - 2015). Her research interests include methodological and applied aspects of computational modelling of cardiac electrophysiology, with emphasis on the role of tissue structure and model parametrization.

Sara Gattoni

Publications:

Projects:

Cardiac Physiology
photo Andrew Sara Gattoni gained her first degree in Mathematics from Alma Mater Studio rum University of Bologna. Italy. She then continued her studies in Bologna were she earned a Master degree in Mathematics (applied) in 2011. She joined the division in 2012 were she’s currently working as a PhD student.

The aim of my research is the development of a physiological rat myocyte electrophysiology model with a particular focus on the calcium dynamics. The majority of the available cell models have been parameterized using inconsistent measurements, collected across a range of species and temperatures, causing obfuscation in the link between parameter values and experimental data. To address this issue we are implementing a new rat electromechanical model, making use of consistent rat data at 37 degrees and combining physiological and statistical based fittings.

Bojan Blazevic

Publications:

Projects:

Modelling Heart Failure
photo Andrew My PhD work is on patient specific modelling of Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy - trying to optimise diagnosis and treatment. The project has focussed on trying to predict treatment outcome based on non-invasive patient data obtained in the clinic. I studied Engineering Science at the University of Auckland, specialising in continuum mechanics.